Talc

Talc

Sulfur
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Composition: Talc (T)

Synonyms/Varieties:
Kerolite
Soapstone
Stealite

Physical Properties:
Color: Colorless, white, pale to dark green, yellowish to brown
Streak: White
Luster: Pearly, waxy, greasy
Hardness: 1
Tenacity: Flexible, sectile
Specific Gravity: 2.58 - 2.83
Cleavage: Perfect, one direction

Crystallography:
System: Monoclinic
Twinning:
Habit: Crystals are tabular. Aggregate are massive, fine-grained compact, foliated or fibrous masses, or as globular stellate groups.

General Information:
Talc is found widespread in California in different locations as different grades. The softness and greasy feel of talc distinguish it from other minerals. Massive talc is called soapstone. California American Indians used it as a sculpting material. Name has been used since antiquity and derived from Arabic. Talc has a number of properties that enable it to be used in ceramics, cosmetics, insecticides, lubricants, ornamentation, pharmaceuticals, plastics, roofing, soaps, and as tub material.

California Counties in Which this Mineral is Found
 

Alameda
Amador
Butte
Calaveras
El Dorado
Glenn
Imperial
Inyo
Los Angeles
Madera
Mariposa
Placer
Riverside
San Benito
San Bernardino
Shasta
Sierra
Siskiyou
Sonoma
Trinity
Yuba
 

Information on Specimen Photo:
Specimen Description: Talc, 10 cm high, Shasta County. California Division of Mines and Geology Library.
Photographer: Max Flanery, CGS.