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NR 2006-12
April 22, 2006

Contact: Ed Wilson
Mark Oldfield
Don Drysdale
(916) 323-1886

PASADENA PILOT PROGRAM WILL RECYCLE
BOTTLES FROM BARS & RESTAURANTS

SACRAMENTO – A pilot project designed to promote a clean supply of recycled glass for California bottle manufacturers gets an Earth Day kick-off Saturday in Pasadena.

Forged through a partnership of the state Department of Conservation, the Glass Packaging Institute, local waste hauler/recycler the Allan Company, and the City of Pasadena, the 18-month effort aims to collect and recycle empty bottles from Pasadena bars and restaurants while reducing contamination that lowers the volume and quality of recycled glass.

“We want to establish a model that can be used in other communities to increase the amount of good, clean, recycled glass available for use in new containers,” said DOC director Bridgett Luther. “By focusing our resources in a specific area, we’ll get a better understanding of what works well and how we can improve glass collection and recycling throughout the state.”

A portion of a grant from DOC to GPI funded collection bins and a specially designed collection truck for use in the project. The Allan Company will market the program to bars and restaurants and service the collection route. Businesses can participate free of charge, and may even see a reduction in their waste hauling bills by virtue of having lower volumes for disposal.

“The hope is that a successful bar and restaurant recycling program will be a win-win for recycling and the participating businesses,” said Joe Cattaneo, president of GPI, the trade association for the North American glass container manufacturing industry (www.gpi.org). “We believe there is a good quantity of clean glass going unrecycled from bars and restaurants. Getting whole bottles that are separated from other containers is a primary goal.”

More than 3 billion glass California Redemption Value beverage containers are sold in California each year, but more than a billion of them typically end up in landfills. Glass can be recycled over and over again, saving energy and natural resources while providing valuable raw materials to manufacturers.

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